Project

OOSC under UNHCR’s Mandate are Provided Access to Quality Equitable Primary Education

Since its inception in 2012, EAC and UNHCR have been working together in countries across the globe to increase access to quality primary education for some of the most disadvantaged out of school children. At the moment, the joint Mandate Project is active in 14 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East seeking to enrol an additional 364,857 children.

OOSC under UNHCR’s Mandate are Provided Access to Quality Equitable Primary Education

UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is a global organisation dedicated to saving lives, protecting rights and building a better future for refugees, forcibly displaced communities and stateless people. Since 1950, it has faced multiple crises on multiple continents and provided vital assistance to vulnerable people in need, many of whom have nobody left to turn to. With the start of the 21st century, UNHCR has helped address major refugee crises in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Regarding education access, UNHCR partners with governments and international organisations to ensure quality protective education for refugee children and young people everywhere. At present, UNHCR has more than 17,000 personnel working in 132 countries and reached over 50 million refugees to successfully restart their lives.

Since 2012, EAC and UNHCR have successfully implemented three partnership projects in 12 countries (14 field operations). This has resulted in the enrolment of more than 1.2 million out of school refugee children into quality primary education. In partnership with EAC, UNHCR has rolled out a fourth project known as OOSC under UNHCR’s Mandate are Provided Access to Quality Equitable Primary Education to build on this collaborative experience and the lessons learned from earlier initiatives. This iteration will be implemented over a three-year period (2020-2022) to enrol an additional 364,857 OOSC across 14 countries, which will include ten of the 12 countries from the previous projects (Chad, Kenya [Dadaab and Kakuma], Malaysia, Pakistan, Rwanda, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, Syria and Yemen) and four new countries namely Cameroon, Iraq, Malawi and Mexico.

The joint EAC/UNHCR Mandate Project is consistent with the latter’s education strategy, which is based on the inclusion of all children into national systems, and is fully aligned with Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG4). The project has as its primary focus refugees and, in a few specific countries, internally displaced populations (IDPs) and also includes the local population as per the approach consistent with the Global Compact on Refugees.

Regarding sustainability, the project strategies correspond with the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF), which aim to leverage partner expertise at all levels to undertake a shift from humanitarian assistance to one that aligns education activities for refugees with national education development plans.

 

For more information about this EAC Implementing Partner, please visit the UNHCR website.

Partners

UNHCR

EAC partnership with UNHCR will ensure quality education for over 448,000 refugee children. UNHCR and EAC’s shared commitment to children in the most extreme circumstances help to ensure that all children in crisis situations have the opportunity to gain from the benefits of basic education.

Countries

Chad

Chad

Chad is one of the world’s largest refugee host countries. In response the educational needs of the children who are out of school, EAC supports two projects in Chad; one of in partnership with UNHCR, and another in collaboration with UNICEF, where the programs supports government efforts to increase primary school completion rates.
Iraq

Iraq

Starting in the 1980s, Iraq, a prosperous oil nation, began to undergo detrimental bouts of violence and military conflict with its neighbours Iran and later Kuwait. These activities along with ensuing international sanctions had far-reaching effects on the country’s economy and development. What remained of the economy was, in large part, destroyed by the 2003 invasion and insurgent attacks on the country’s infrastructure, which have cost Iraq billions in revenue. At present, significant levels of sectarian violence, insecurity and corruption hamper the country’s development prospects.
Kenya

Kenya

Located in East Africa, Kenya shares borders with five other countries and the Indian Ocean. The country is home to 42 distinct ethnic groups, comprising a population of approximately 38.6 million. For the most part, Kenya’s recent history has been characterised by relatively peaceful and stable domestic relations, though in 2007 post-election violence brought to the fore ethnic tensions, which reversed hard-earned socio-economic gains. Since then the government has sought to make education reform central to the social pillar of its initiative Kenya Vision 2030.
Malawi

Malawi

Situated in Southern Africa, the Republic of Malawi is a landlocked country, sharing borders with Mozambique, Tanzania and Zambia. Soon after declaring independence the British in July 1964, the country was ruled by Dr Hastings Banda who presided over a one-party state for the next three decades. In 1994, Bakili Muluzi of the United Democratic Front was elected president in the country’s first ever multi-party elections. Occupying roughly 118,000 square kilometres, Malawi’s main exports are tobacco, tea, sugar and cotton. According to the UN, life expectancy for men and women in the country is approximately 55 years and GDP growth in 2012 was 1.8 per cent. In 2015, Malawi ranked 170 out of 188 other countries and territories on the UN’s Human Development Index.
Malaysia

Malaysia

Situated in the South China Sea, Malaysia, a peninsula of approximately 30 million people, shares land borders with Brunei, Indonesia and Thailand. Considered an upper middle-income country, Malaysia, averaged real GDP growth of almost six per cent per annum between 2000-2013. The country consists of 13 states and three federal territories. In 2011, roughly 73 per cent of Malaysia’s population is found in urban centres, especially in Georgetown, Johor Bahru, Kota Kinabalu, Kuala Lumpur, Kuantan and Kuching. The country has a multi-ethnic demographic composition, consisting of ethnic Malays, Chinese, Indians and other groups. Additionally, Malaysia is host to numerous migrant and refugee communities. Endowed with a youthful population, about 26 per cent of the country’s people are under the age of 14.
Pakistan

Pakistan

Pakistan is transitioning from an agriculture economy to one oriented around industry and services. The country spends a large proportion of its budget on national security and loan interest payments, leaving relatively smaller amounts for investment in infrastructure and social services, such as health and education.
Rwanda

Rwanda

Located in Central Africa, the Republic of Rwanda is a landlocked country, sharing borders with Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania and Uganda. Since the genocidal massacre that claimed the lives of approximately 800,000 people in 1994, Rwanda has striven to reconstruct and rebuild. The elaboration of Vision 2020 has set Rwanda’s sights on becoming a modern, strong and united middle-income country oriented around a knowledge-based economy and the government has sought to position itself as an investment beacon in the region by building a solid base of human capital. However, the agricultural sector is still a key driver of the economy, as it accounts for roughly one-third of GDP and 80 per cent of the population is employed therein. The country’s principal exports consist of coffee, tea, sorghum, livestock, beans, potatoes and tobacco. Notably, the poverty rate across Rwanda declined 12 per cent from 2006 and 2012.
South Sudan

South Sudan

The Republic of South Sudan became the world’s youngest country on 9 July 2011, following the conclusion of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement and a partition with its northern neighbour, Sudan. The fledgling country has, since its birth, known relatively little peace, security and stability. Political in-fighting amongst the ruling Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) has fuelled tensions and conflict, particularly between the country’s two largest ethnic groups – the Dinka and the Nuer. The ongoing conflict has wreaked havoc on South Sudan’s infrastructure and school-age children, producing scores of internally displaced people and refugees, stretching the country’s already thin resources.
Sudan

Sudan

Located near the north-eastern corner of the continent, the Republic of the Sudan shares borders with seven other African countries in the North and the sub-Sahara. Until the partition of its southern half in July 2011, which led to the birth of South Sudan, the country was the most geographically diverse and largest state in Africa. Though acceding to southern independence, various outstanding issues with South Sudan fester, especially regarding the matter of shared oil revenues and border demarcation. In addition, Sudan is still beset by conflict stemming from unrest in the western region of Darfur.
Syrian Arab Republic

Syrian Arab Republic

Syria is a country of 14 provinces with its capital based in Damascus. Its economy has deteriorated steadily amid the ongoing conflict that began in 2011, declining by an estimated 62 percent from 2010 to 2014. The government has struggled to address the effects of international sanctions, widespread infrastructure damage, diminished domestic consumption and production and rising inflation, which has led to spiking budget and trade deficits, a shrinking value of the Syrian pound and falling household purchasing power.
Uganda

Uganda

Uganda has made substantial progress to date toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In partnership with UNHCR, Plan Canada and Building Tomorrow, EAC works to support both refugee and primary education in Uganda.
Yemen

Yemen

Retaining much of its tribal character, north and south Yemen joined forces in 1990 to become what we know today as Yemen. Internal conflict in the form of protests resulted in then president Saleh stepping down. Political reforms followed, however in September 2014, rebels seized the capital, Sanaa and according to the BBC, have shown no signs of readiness to withdraw. EAC partnerships with UNHCR and with UNICEF will ensure quality education for tens of thousands of children in Yemen.