Project

Primary (School) Access through Speed Schools + (PASS+) Project

Through the Primary (School) Access through Speed Schools + (PASS+) Project, Plan International will increase the quality and supply of formal primary education and non-formal accelerated-learning programmes (Speed Schools) by focusing on community mobilisation, capacity development of stakeholders and improved education governance.

PASS+ will follow two distinct pathways to bring this to fruition. The first being Speed School Interventions, which are community-supported and managed accelerated-learning programmes that cover primary school curriculum for classes 1 through 3 via an intensive nine-month course. The second pathway, Primary School Interventions, specifically targets OOSC between the ages of 6 and 14 who may never enrol, have enrolled late by less than a year, and/or have dropped out for less than a year and are seeking re-entry. Campaigns will be launched to promote this demographics’ enrolment into primary school.

To achieve sustainability, the project proceeds with the notion that the good practices emerging from the implementation of PASS+ shall be mainstreamed into the official education systems of Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. In effect, the PASS+ sustainability model is comprised of five key pillars: 1) alignment with national and sub-regional OOSC strategies; 2) training of Speed School teachers; 3) community participation and ownership; 4) building the capacity of key institutions; and 5) coordination and coherence between funding partners and government actions.    

Partners

Plan International

Plan International has been working in sub-Saharan Africa since the 1970s, helping poor children to realise their right to health, education, food security and protection. EAC has partnered with Plan to ensure that hundreds of thousands of primary-school age children access quality education in Ghana and Uganda. Furthermore, EAC and Plan have collaborated to expand access to Speed Schools in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. Through separate initiatives, EAC and Plan aim to reach 331,000 out of school children (OOSC) in Ghana, Uganda, and Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger.

Countries

Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso

Despite the country’s recent bouts of political unrest, Burkina Faso has made sizeable gains with regard to the pursuit of EFA. Between 2000 and 2012, the country more than doubled its score on EFA’s index for African countries. Notwithstanding this indicator of progress, Burkina Faso’s education sector is still fraught with challenges – the country’s index totals were approximately 25 points below the average scores registered by its African counterparts.
Mali

Mali

Situated in the heart of West Africa, Mali is a Sahelian country that shares borders with seven other African countries. Recent estimates indicate that if annual population growths continues unabated at 3.6 percent, Mali’s population under the age of 25 will double. As it happens, the country’s population is unevenly distributed throughout the national territory, as 77.5 percent of people live in disparate rural areas. Roughly 73 percent of people in rural areas and 63 percent of the population overall live in poverty. Compounding matters, an armed conflict and instability emanating from the North, have, since 2012, brought about a humanitarian crisis in the country and an influx of refugees into neighbouring Burkina Faso and Niger.
Niger

Niger

Landlocked in West Africa, Niger is a Sahelian/Saharan country, sharing borders with seven other African countries. In comparison with some of its oil-rich neighbours, Niger is endowed with relatively scant natural resource wealth. Furthermore, the country is beset by an array of challenges related to desertification and the expansion of the Sahara, as well as cyclical droughts. In 2012, an armed conflict and instability from neighbouring Mali, precipitated a humanitarian crisis in and an influx of refugees into the country. As of 2014, Niger appeared at the 187th position in the United Nations Human Development Index. Demographic pressures (3.9 percent annual population growth) weigh on the country’s development prospects as well.