Korea International Cooperation Agency (co-Financing Partner)

The Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) was established as a government-funded agency dedicated to providing grant-aid programmes on the part of the Korean Government in 1991.

Korea International Cooperation Agency (co-Financing Partner)
Korea International Cooperation Agency (co-Financing Partner)

The organisation serves both domestically and internationally as a development coordination platform, working towards the realisation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As its mission, KOICA seeks to contribute to addressing global development issues by pursuing global harmony and facilitating the sustainable socio-economic development of its partner countries, aiming to reduce poverty and improve the quality of life in developing countries. Ultimately, KOICA strives to become a beacon of development cooperation that works to initiate a new era of global happiness and it values knowledge, openness, innovation, collaboration and accountability.

For more information about this EAC co-Financing Partner, please visit the KOICA website.

Projects

Addressing Barriers to Enrolment and Retention in Karamoja (ABER-K)

Over the course of a three-year period, EAC and World Vision’s Addressing Barriers to Enrolment and Retention in Karamoja (ABER-K) project aims to reach 40,000 OOSC in Karamoja’s Abim, Kotido and Kaabong districts.

Inspire: A Programme to Motivate and Make Education Accessible through Monastic Schools

A vastly diverse country with an estimated total of 135 distinct ethnic groups, Myanmar has at times struggled to unify its people under the banner of the nation. Ethnic strife and violent conflict are not unknown in Myanmar and have resulted in large-scale internal displacement and refugee flows into neighbouring countries. Furthermore, the Myanmar government has grappled with providing quality basic education, as well as affording different linguistic modes of instruction, which would be more accessible to the country’s diverse ethnic populations. Although education data is scarce in Myanmar, some figures indicate a net primary-enrolment rate of 84 percent; however, 10 percent of these enrolled children will not endure to class 5. According to a Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS), as of 2010 there were at least 1 million OOSC in the country.

Southeast Asia School Development Project for OOSC

Across remote rural communities in Cambodia, Myanmar and Nepal, access to quality primary education is inhibited for myriad diverse factors. In the Ratanakiri and Stung Treng Provinces of Cambodia, stigmatisation and discrimination against ethnic minority communities have pushed indigenous peoples outside the reach of the public education system. According to UNESCO, Myanmar allocated just 1.6 percent of its GDP to education in 2010, which had been indicative of generations of underinvestment in the country’s education systems. To date, the Myanmar government does not have the capacity or the infrastructure to reach the most remote communities in rural areas. As for Nepal, scant government investment in education and where schools exist, mismanagement, teacher absenteeism, a lack of parental commitment and the high-cost of school fees, coalesce to put education out of bounds for the most disparate members of society.
Enabling, Encouraging & Excelling

Enabling, Encouraging & Excelling

As the global refugee protection agency, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) is responsible for ensuring that refugee children have access to quality education in their countries of asylum. There are over 2.7 million refugee children out of school in 12 targeted project countries.