All Countries

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Bangladesh

Bangladesh

According to UNICEF, 40% of Bangladesh’s population is children and statistics indicate that 600,000 are out of school. To contribute to increased enrolment, we have forged partnerships in Bangladesh and are currently working on four project programs that extend over a period of 1 – 6 years. Upon completion our projects will contribute to the enrollment of more than 200,000 children.
Brazil

Brazil

In conjunction with our partner in Aprendiz, we work to enrol and retain Brazil’s out of school children. The partnership allows us to work with government towards the integration of policies and intervention strategies that support out of school children. Our completed project with Todos Pela Educação centred on advocacy initiatives to mobilise resources for school inclusion, retention and education quality for the country’s out of school children.
Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso

Despite the country’s recent bouts of political unrest, Burkina Faso has made sizeable gains with regard to the pursuit of EFA. Between 2000 and 2012, the country more than doubled its score on EFA’s index for African countries. Notwithstanding this indicator of progress, Burkina Faso’s education sector is still fraught with challenges – the country’s index totals were approximately 25 points below the average scores registered by its African counterparts.
Cambodia

Cambodia

The Kingdom of Cambodia has, over the last decade, enjoyed robust economic growth – GDP is estimated to have grown at approximately 8 percent between 2000 and 2010, and at least at 7 percent since 2011. As such, the government envisions Cambodia entering the realms of lower-middle income country status by 2030 and achieving developed country status by 2050.
Chad

Chad

Chad is one of the world’s largest refugee host countries. In response the educational needs of the children who are out of school, EAC supports two projects in Chad; one of in partnership with UNHCR, and another in collaboration with UNICEF, where the programs supports government efforts to increase primary school completion rates.
Comoros

Comoros

Exacerbated by a history of political violence, the people of the Comoros are among the poorest in Africa and remain heavily dependent on foreign aid. In this country, EAC works with UNICEF to increase access to primary education for hard-to-reach children and marginalized groups, including girls who have been left out by previous programs.
Côte d’Ivoire

Côte d’Ivoire

Situated in West Africa, Côte d’Ivoire shares borders with five other countries. Once considered the jewel of West Africa, due to its modern cities and steady economic growth, Côte d’Ivoire has been embattled of late, grappling with the aftermath of a protracted political/military conflict that boiled over in 2010. However, the country has begun to consolidate the gains of relative peace, political stability and community development initiatives. Still, increasing demographic pressures and economic stagnation weigh heavily over Côte d’Ivoire’s education sector.
Democratic Republic of the Congo

Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the African continent’s second largest country in terms of sheer landmass and shares borders with nine other countries. The DRC is endowed with enormous natural resource wealth, such as gold, copper, cobalt and uranium, and approximately 34 percent of its territory is fertile, arable land. However, the country’s natural resources have, over the years, proven burdensome, as they have engendered corruption at the highest levels and sustained armed conflicts.
Ethiopia

Ethiopia

Situated in East Africa, Ethiopia is vast, shares borders with six other countries and has a population of 84 million, the second highest on the continent. Annual population growth is estimated at 2.6 percent and children under the age of 15 are thought to total 33 million. The country has a federal system of governance and includes nine states and two city administrations. The government has made a concerted effort to link the education sector with macroeconomic policy to achieve the objective of arriving at middle-income country status by 2025.
Ghana

Ghana

Ghana is composed of three principal ecological zones: the Coastal Savannah, the Forest and the Northern Savannah (Upper West, Upper East and Northern regions). The country’s economy is bolstered by cocoa production and gold-mining, which occur primarily in the south. By contrast, the north has a harsher environment and is characterised by seasonal southward migration of workers and their families. Ghana’s north has the highest rates of poverty and illiteracy in the country.
Haiti

Haiti

The Republic of Haiti is the poorest country in the Western hemisphere. EAC works in partnership with CARE and buildOn to provide access to quality primary education for out of school children.
India

India

India, with a population of 1.2 billion, is the world’s largest democracy. The country is vast, composed of 29 States and seven Union Territories with diverse socio-cultural contexts and various geographic and climatic conditions. As regards India’s governing structure, the Centre and the States share responsibility for planning and implementation of development programming.
Indonesia

Indonesia

With a population of around 250 million spread over seventeen thousand islands, across five thousand miles, Indonesia’s people are ethnically diverse as can be witnessed through their use of 300 different local languages. EAC partners with UNESCO in Indonesia to help out of school children overcome barriers to education.
Iran

Iran

EAC partnership with UNHCR will ensure quality education for over 227,000 refugee children in 12 countries. UNHCR and EAC’s shared commitment to children in the most extreme circumstances helps to ensure that all children in crisis situations have the opportunity to gain from the benefits of basic education.
Iraq

Iraq

Starting in the 1980s, Iraq, a prosperous oil nation, began to undergo detrimental bouts of violence and military conflict with its neighbours Iran and later Kuwait. These activities along with ensuing international sanctions had far-reaching effects on the country’s economy and development. What remained of the economy was, in large part, destroyed by the 2003 invasion and insurgent attacks on the country’s infrastructure, which have cost Iraq billions in revenue. At present, significant levels of sectarian violence, insecurity and corruption hamper the country’s development prospects.
Jordan

Jordan

Located at the crossroads of the Middle East, Jordan shares borders with Iraq, Israel, the Occupied Palestinian Territories, Saudi Arabia and Syria. Unlike many of the country’s eastern and southern neighbours, Jordan has no oil deposits and as such, services, tourism and U.S. foreign assistance are central to its economy. A blueprint, known as the National Agenda, articulating the country’s path towards long-term political, economic and social reform has yet to be fully implemented, though multi-party politics were introduced in 1992.
Kenya

Kenya

Located in East Africa, Kenya shares borders with five other countries and the Indian Ocean. The country is home to 42 distinct ethnic groups, comprising a population of approximately 38.6 million. For the most part, Kenya’s recent history has been characterised by relatively peaceful and stable domestic relations, though in 2007 post-election violence brought to the fore ethnic tensions, which reversed hard-earned socio-economic gains. Since then the government has sought to make education reform central to the social pillar of its initiative Kenya Vision 2030.
Lao People’s Democratic Republic

Lao People’s Democratic Republic

The Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), otherwise known as Laos has achieved consistently high levels of economic growth over the last decade; this is due to natural resource development. Poverty is declining in this country because of governmental reforms currently underway. The World Bank states that a significant challenge for Laos will be to ensure that the wealth coming from the cultivation of natural resources is transformed into investments in education, infrastructure, health and services, particularly for the most impoverished.
Lebanon

Lebanon

Lebanon has long been a hub for commerce and political concern from various interests. A diverse mix of communities and governance issues have aroused the concern of neighbouring states at different times. Lebanon has housed waves of Palestinian refugees and more recently Syrians fleeing conflict, placing a significant strain on the country’s resources.
Malawi

Malawi

Since 2007, Malawi has achieved real progression towards healthy economic growth; healthcare, education and environmental conditions have all improved and Malawi has opened the way for reduced reliance on foreign aid. EAC and partner BuildOn are working together to increase access to quality primary education.
Malaysia

Malaysia

This upper-middle income country has witnessed successful economic growth where each year for 30 years, between 1967 and 1997, it managed 7% growth. According to the World Bank 50% of Malaysia’s population lived below the poverty line in the 1960’s compared to less than 2% today. EAC, in partnership with UNHCR and UNESCO are working to provide access to a full course of quality of primary education for out of school children in Malaysia.
Mali

Mali

Situated in the heart of West Africa, Mali is a Sahelian country that shares borders with seven other African countries. Recent estimates indicate that if annual population growths continues unabated at 3.6 percent, Mali’s population under the age of 25 will double. As it happens, the country’s population is unevenly distributed throughout the national territory, as 77.5 percent of people live in disparate rural areas. Roughly 73 percent of people in rural areas and 63 percent of the population overall live in poverty. Compounding matters, an armed conflict and instability emanating from the North, have, since 2012, brought about a humanitarian crisis in the country and an influx of refugees into neighbouring Burkina Faso and Niger.
Myanmar

Myanmar

Myanmar, the largest mainland country in Southeast Asia, is home to more than approximately 130 ethnic groups with distinct cultures and languages. The country has known periodic spells of armed conflict and inter-communal violence, particularly in border areas, which trigger flows of refugees and internal displacement. In addition, poverty is a formidable development challenge in Myanmar. According to the 2009-2010 Integrated Household Living Conditions Survey in Myanmar, 26 percent of the population lived below the national poverty line and poverty incidence was concentrated in Ayeyarwaddy, Chin, Rakhine, Shan and Tanintharyi.
Nepal

Nepal

Located between China to the North and India to the South, Nepal is a landlocked country composed of a vastly diverse population with distinct cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds. A 2011 national census revealed that the country was home to at least 125 ethnic groups. According to the Nepal Living Standards Survey conducted the year prior, approximately one-fourth of the population lives below the poverty line. Furthermore, the 2013 United Nations Human Development Index classified Nepal 157 amongst 187 countries. In April 2015, a massive earthquake killed scores of people and devastated the country’s infrastructure.
Niger

Niger

Landlocked in West Africa, Niger is a Sahelian/Saharan country, sharing borders with seven other African countries. In comparison with some of its oil-rich neighbours, Niger is endowed with relatively scant natural resource wealth. Furthermore, the country is beset by an array of challenges related to desertification and the expansion of the Sahara, as well as cyclical droughts. In 2012, an armed conflict and instability from neighbouring Mali, precipitated a humanitarian crisis in and an influx of refugees into the country. As of 2014, Niger appeared at the 187th position in the United Nations Human Development Index. Demographic pressures (3.9 percent annual population growth) weigh on the country’s development prospects as well.
Nigeria

Nigeria

Nigeria is a federation of 36 states and a Federal Capital Territory, Abuja. An estimated 48 percent of the population is urbanised and 52 percent live in rural areas; an approximate 60 percent of people work in agriculture. Today, Nigeria boasts Africa’s largest economy with an estimated GDP of US$479 billion. GDP growth is estimated at 6.1 percent (excluding oil and mining), due to strong performances in professional services, industry and agriculture. The country’s main exports are petroleum, petroleum products, cocoa and rubber. Oil accounts for about 90 percent of Nigeria’s exports and 75 percent of budgetary revenues. Yet troublingly, oil and gas revenues are thought to have dropped by 14.4 percent since 2013.
Pakistan

Pakistan

Pakistan is transitioning from an agriculture economy to one oriented around industry and services. The country spends a large proportion of its budget on national security and loan interest payments, leaving relatively smaller amounts for investment in infrastructure and social services, such as health and education.
Philippines

Philippines

Philippines is home to more than 98 million people who live across more than 7,000 islands in South East Asia, much of which is mountainous and prone to earthquakes and eruptions from any of its 20 active volcanoes - as well as being subjected to typhoons and storms. Forecasters say that the birth rate is so high in this country that its population could double within three decades (BBC). EAC has partnered with UNESCO to strengthen education systems for Out of School Children.
Rwanda

Rwanda

EAC partnership with UNHCR will ensure quality education for over 227,000 refugee children in 12 countries. UNHCR and EAC’s shared commitment to children in the most extreme circumstances helps to ensure that all children in crisis situations have the opportunity to gain from the benefits of basic education.
Senegal

Senegal

Located in West Africa, Senegal is a Sahelian/Saharan country, sharing borders with five other African nations and the Atlantic Ocean. Between 1988 and 2011, the country’s population nearly doubled and as of 2013 that figure stood at nearly 13.5 million. Approximately 50 per cent of Senegal’s people are under the age of 20 and 23 per cent of the people live in the country’s capital city, Dakar. Senegal’s youthful and rapid population growth exerts pressure on the education system in terms of enrolment, access to higher levels and the learning environments.
Somalia

Somalia

The multiple levels of crisis in Somalia have affected education delivery and contributed to one of the lowest school enrolment rates in the world with only 42% of primary school age children in school. EAC works with CARE and UNICEF to ensure the most vulnerable can gain access to primary education.
South Africa

South Africa

Poverty is a significant barrier to education in South Africa and despite significant successes in developing the diversity of the economy since the end of apartheid. Although close to achievement, South Africa still faces challenges in meeting the millennium development goal of universal primary education. EAC is working with the Roger Federer Foundation to improve the quality of education in Limpopo, to increase the enrolment and retention of out of school children.
South Sudan

South Sudan

The Republic of South Sudan became the world’s youngest country on 9 July 2011, following the conclusion of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement and a partition with its northern neighbour, Sudan. The fledgling country has, since its birth, known relatively little peace, security and stability. Political in-fighting amongst the ruling Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) has fuelled tensions and conflict, particularly between the country’s two largest ethnic groups – the Dinka and the Nuer. The ongoing conflict has wreaked havoc on South Sudan’s infrastructure and school-age children, producing scores of internally displaced people and refugees, stretching the country’s already thin resources.
Sudan

Sudan

Sudan has the highest out of school rate in Northern Africa; almost one third of the country’s children—more than three million—are not receiving basic education. EAC is partnered with two of its strategic partners to reduce the numbers of OOSC in the country.
Syrian Arab Republic

Syrian Arab Republic

Syria is a country of 14 provinces with its capital based in Damascus. Its economy has deteriorated steadily amid the ongoing conflict that began in 2011, declining by an estimated 62 percent from 2010 to 2014. The government has struggled to address the effects of international sanctions, widespread infrastructure damage, diminished domestic consumption and production and rising inflation, which has led to spiking budget and trade deficits, a shrinking value of the Syrian pound and falling household purchasing power.
Tanzania

Tanzania

Tanzania, located in East Africa, borders eight other countries to the North, West, South and the Indian Ocean to the East. The country is a democratic nation and has operated under a multi-party system since 1992. Tanzania’s economy is largely oriented around agricultural production and variations in rainfall are not without effect. However, according to the World Bank, the country regularly posts “impressive growth” and has, in effect, outperformed other developed countries and fast-emerging economies on occasion. Yet the World Bank has also cautioned that the benefits of Tanzania’s economic growth mostly elude rural populations, who comprise the majority of the country’s poor.
Thailand

Thailand

Thailand, the only country in South East Asia to have escaped colonial rule, today boasts an upper-middle income economy. The World Bank states that this country will likely succeed in meeting most of the millennium development goals on aggregate basis. Whilst the economy grew at a strong 8-9% per year in the 80’s and 90’s it slowed to around 5% between 2002 and 2007, and in 2014 economic growth is projected to be around 1.5%. EAC partners with Save the Children and UNESCO in order to increase enrollment for out of school children in both national and refugee communities in Thailand.
Timor Leste

Timor Leste

As one of the poorest nations in Asia, it is said that Timor-Leste (formerly East Timor) will rely on outside Aid for many years to come. This country has a well-known recent history of how its independence came about; the people of this country were met with very high levels of atrocity and violence. Over the past decade and post-independence, however, Timor-Leste has begun to benefit from the foundations of successful development. EAC, in partnership with UNESCO, aims to support children in this country by providing a full course of quality primary education to out of school children.
Turkey

Turkey

Bordering Syria, it is no surprise that the United Nations (UN) estimates as many as 1.6 million Syrian refugees have crossed over into Turkey. EAC’s partnership with The U.S. Fund for UNICEF will support an increase in access to education for vulnerable and displaced OOSC, increasing safe learning spaces and ensuring the provision of all necessary elements required for a full course of high quality primary education.
Uganda

Uganda

Uganda has made substantial progress to date toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In partnership with UNHCR, Plan Canada and Building Tomorrow, EAC works to support both refugee and primary education in Uganda.
Vietnam

Vietnam

Vietnam is emerging from decades of colonialism, war, and an impoverished command economy. Because of extreme poverty, children often must work before and after school to support their family, usually by peddling something, working in factories, and offering other goods and services. EAC and our partner UNESCO are aiming to provide support to Vietnamese children to overcome the barriers to education.
Yemen

Yemen

Retaining much of its tribal character, north and south Yemen joined forces in 1990 to become what we know today as Yemen. Internal conflict in the form of protests resulted in then president Saleh stepping down. Political reforms followed, however in September 2014, rebels seized the capital, Sanaa and according to the BBC, have shown no signs of readiness to withdraw. EAC partnerships with UNHCR and with UNICEF will ensure quality education for tens of thousands of children in Yemen.
Zambia

Zambia

A landlocked country in Southern Africa, Zambia shares borders with eight other African countries. According to a national census conducted in 2010, the majority of Zambia’s population is predominately located in rural areas (61 percent) and just under half (45.4 percent) are young people below the age of 15. Economic progress since independence has been uneven, though recent strides in real GDP growth have been remarkable and Zambia is transitioning from a poorer country to an expansive lower-middle income country.