Resources Barrier

Human resources

EAC priority countries have been selected due to their large number of OOSC, and this correlates in most cases with low GDP per capita, recovery from conflict, and inadequate teacher development.

Why does low quality of teaching act as a barrier to enrolment and participation?

The three critical areas of supportive skills need to be employed if a primary level teacher is to achieve positive learning outcomes for all of his or her class of children. If a teacher does not possess the abilities and attitudes defined as the requirement of a good teacher, many of the children in the class will have little to show for their participation in school. If teaching quality is low, children will be pushed out of school. Poor families will be unwilling to meet the cash requirements or opportunity costs of education.

How pervasive is it?

EAC priority countries have been selected due to their large number of OOSC, and this correlates in most cases with low GDP per capita, recovery from conflict, and inadequate teacher development. Many teachers have no training at all. Low quality of teaching is pervasive across regions with high OOSC populations. This is not to say that all teaching is low quality, but exceptionally skilled teaching is not the norm.

Examples of EAC partners who are addressing human resource quality

Many EAC partners include investment in teaching quality as an element of interrelated strategies for OOSC. Here are some examples.

In Somalia, UNICEF is identifying and providing access to primary education for 64,000 out of school children. To create demand for education from children and parents, the initiative will ensure that newly enrolled children receive a quality education program through training 1,726 teachers in classroom skills and 616 school leaders in instructional leadership skills.

In Bangladesh, BRAC is enrolling 13,000 OOSC in school on purpose-built boats. To deliver programs, BRAC is training the 500 teachers that it is engaging.

For refugee children in 12 priority countries, UNHCR is providing primary education for about 173,000 children. In most situations, teachers engaged receive training to ensure that the primary education program delivered by UNHCR is of quality.